Comic Comment – The Fate of The King of Wolves

Fab 122 Cov

Keeping true to form of long arc followed by a short one, Fables issues 122 & 123 comprise a mini arc entitled The Destiny Game. The last time we visited the Fables title the Cubs In Toyland arc had just completed.  The last few stories involving Bigby and Snow’s cubs have centered on the San Diego 2009 Comic Con One Page Fables predecitions.  We’ve seen Winter become the North Wind, Therese did an evil thing, Darien died to stop her.  Though she could be the pauper too – because now she is one.  Ghost killed people before s/he learned that was wrong, except no one died to stop Ghost that I can remember.   This two story arc is concerned with Ambrose as an adult, we see his fate.  We also learn how Bigby and his cubs came to have their designated fates.  Another excellent story with fantastic art brought to us by the team at Fables.

The second story of the issue continues to follow Bifkin’s adventures in Oz. It moves to the title story in the next issue. Bifkin’s revolution continues and now he’s found himself the leader of a great nation. Faced with the same issues as George Washington, offered a kingship, needing to lead but wanting to retire to his beloved library Bifkin has some hefty choices to make and ideas to implement.

First the legal disclaimer: All images are the property of their owners I reproduce them here under the Fair Use Doctrine of the copyright law for commentary and critique. No more than three pages total from any one issue is reproduced.

Now for the creative team on this arc first story entitled The Destiny Game:  Written and Created by Bill Willingham – Guest art by Gene Ha – guest colors by Art Lyon – letters by Todd Klien – Special Thanks to Zander Cannon – Issue 123 also included Andrew Pepoy in the Special Thanks – Assistant editor Gregory Lockard – Editor Shelly Bond

The creative team for the A Revolution in Oz: Bill Willingham, Writer/Creator – Shawn McManus, Artist – Todd Klein, Letters – Gregory Lockard, Assistant Editor – Shelly Bond, Editor.

It seems every time I comment on Fables it becomes a love letter to them for doing what I dream comics can do.  Last commentary on Fables I mentioned how they evoke my childhood love for Classics Illustrated.  This arc pulls on that more with the adult Ambrose being the author/narrator of the tale.  The illustrations are the same fine quality as those beloved comics from long ago.  The structure of the tale reminds me of many of the classics.  I was entranced at the first and not disappointed by the story or the art.

Fab 123 cov

Ambrose explains how Bigby got the fate of marrying his beloved Snow and having seven pups with the destines of “to become Gods and Monsters that lay waste to worlds.”  Whose fates were later refined by Ozma’s one page prediction from SDCC 2009.

Here in the story Bigby prefers his wolf form and rules the forest.  He longs to kill his father.  He runs into the green skinned woman that doles out fates.  Upon chasing her he makes a deal to hear his fate.  It is one of death in three days.  He goes to mourn his fate in his forest.

There he meets a familar background character – the turtle wearing the teacup world on her back.  She’s a vain queen whose fate was to become this turtle and warn others.  She explains that the green skinned lady doesn’t read fates, she assigns them!  She’s the messenger for the 3 fates.

Here we see the Fates give their messenger 7 important fates.  The same number of children Bigby later has.  Is it coincidence?  Are the important fates the children that are to become Gods and Monsters?  The story doesn’t answer these questions.  We are left to ponder and draw our own conclusions.

Just how Bigby gets the fate of Snow and his cubs instead of death in three days is answered.  Also how Ambrose knows this story when even Bigby doesn’t know the fate he’s given in full is also answered.   It worth the read to see how the simple tale sheds new light on the fates that have unfurled in the last few Fables arcs.

Finally we are left to ponder this part of Bigby’s fate “You’ll outlive all your children but only after you’ve died seven times.”  Any guesses on how THAT is going to come into play?  I see fodder for Willingham to build many more excellent arcs around the Wolf family.

The Revolution in Oz story is just a few pages in each each issue.  Here we see the the final defeat of the current Emperor. It pays to have an animated hanging rope on your side.  The Toms of the Emperor are fleeing leaving Bifkin’s revolutionaries in power.  So now what?  That’s why the story takes the title role in the next issue as I said.

*****Page Scans**** Warning****Maybe Considered Spoilery********

Here we learn Ambrose lives to adulthood and has a very comfortable life.  Also he's writing down the history of Fables in the Mundy world - now on Volume 7 of his work.  This is just the 2nd page of the story.

Here we learn Ambrose lives to adulthood and has a very comfortable life. Also he’s writing down the history of Fables in the Mundy world – now on Volume 7 of his work. This is just the 2nd page of the story.

Here Bigby gets the idea his fate might not be sealed after all.

Here Bigby gets the idea his fate might not be sealed after all.

I think I agree with Bigby it's best to go through life not knowing your fate than wasting your life anxiously anticipating your fate.

I think I agree with Bigby it’s best to go through life not knowing your fate than wasting your life anxiously anticipating your fate.

Maybe the Emperor shouldn't have called for subjects when the only one left was the hanging rope - that's calling your fate to you isn't it?

Maybe the Emperor shouldn’t have called for subjects when the only one left was the hanging rope – that’s calling your fate to you isn’t it?

Until next time!

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